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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  May 24, 2011 2:05am-4:00am PDT

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>> tomorrow, all new. more of the biggest names in the business are waiting backstage. from chicago's famed united center, oprah's surprise farewell spectacular, part two--one more hour of surprises. >> ladies and gentlemen, jerry seinfeld. oprah: m.j.'s in the house! >> one more hour of legends... oprah: aretha franklin! >> one more hour of television
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history. be there for the second-to-last "oprah winfrey show" ever. tomorrow. oprah: thank you for being a part of this, this great night, this celebration of what you have done for "the oprah winfrey show." you have made it possible for us to stand for 25 years. your presence in front of your television set and your presence here tonight honors me in the deepest way possible, and i feel the love. thank you. >> don't touch that dial. we will see you tomorrow for the second-to-the-last show in "oprah" history. [captioning made possible by king world] [captioned by the national captioning institute -www.ncicap.org--]
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tough to look at these pictures there. back to our top story. we are talking about the direct hit. an american tragedy in joplin, missouri. in the town of 47,000, there is destruction as far as the eye can see in just about every direction. >> oh, yeah, including at the hospital where devastation there was endless, so bad, get this, medical supplies from inside the building were found almost 100 miles away. diane sawyer has more. >> reporter: as the tornado right out of a nightmare tore through joplin, citizens huddled inside buildings in the dark. [ screaming ] >> reporter: listen, as these people feel, sense what is around them. [ screaming ] >> jesus, jesus, jesus! >> reporter: a scene described by sheila and mark harrington, as they huddled inside a giant
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hospital, st. john's, in the emergency room. >> there was no light. and we had very little flashlights. they were screaming and looking for their loved ones and saying that they couldn't find them. and they wanted someone to help them. >> reporter: more than 100 patients were inside the nine-story hospital. gurneys, wheelchairs, tossed hundreds of yards away. x-rays, medical records dumped two counties away, 60 miles, carried by the tornado. and inside the hospital, there was triage, there was rushing to help, but still, so many died. rod pace, one of the medical flight managers, described holding on to a door trying to keep it shut against the suction as it tore the building apart. >> we were holding the door closed. we were trying to hold the door closed. it felt like the door would move. i have heard people talk about a building and how it breathes when it is on fire. it felt like that building was breathing. that door would move in and out.
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>> could you feel the suction? did it pull on you? what happened? >> we moved in and out. with the door. the door never came open. >> holding on to it like this? >> it's an automatic locking door. essentially i was leaning into the door. one of the pilots was basically holding on to me. >> reporter: in the aftermath the hospital evacuated in just 90 minutes. medical personnel, loading patients on the back of pickup trucks and rushing them to a nearby hospital or another triage center. some held the iv poles for the patients. while seeing all around them a scene from "armageddon." >> this structure has been here a long, long time and meant a lot to the people that work in it and a lot to the community. and that's, that's a major devastation. >> you can imagine so many folks in the area looking for loved ones who are still missing. if you are one of them, the red cross safe and well website is where you can turn to locate any one you may be looking for. >> the reality, this is still unfolding. the story is just happening right now even in the middle of
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the night as they continue to look for people who might be trapped. so an ongoing situation that is getting updated every minute. >> they have found some survivors, which is -- just gives some much-needed hope. of course stay with abc news for continuing coverage all morning of this tragedy, diane sawyer leading our coverage later today on "good morning america." >> okay, and coming up, we are going to shift gears and talk a little bit about arnold schwarzenegger. the former maid, housekeeper, mother of his love child is going to take some legal action. >> we're right on top of that. the final performances of the season on "dancing with the stars." who you think will win.
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♪ skinny ♪ so skinny >> all right, time for your "skinny" now. and first we'll lead off with, of course, "dancing with the stars" down to the final three. everyone wondering who will take the lead. some people say kirstie is the fan favorite, chelsea is doing well. hines is doing really well. who is it going to be? >> no one knows. the big finale is tonight.
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interesting to see who comes out on top. i think hines ward may pull it out here. kirstie, not sure she is the best dancer of the three. best dancer. >> but she did a cartwheel last night. she dropped a lot of weight. she looks really good for all that exercise. reality is -- everybody looks really good. could be anybody's guess who will get the mirror ball trophy. afterwards i don't know what you do with it. hang it from the ceiling? >> what would you do with the big thing? good luck to the final three. sure it will be a good finale tonight. >> can't wait to see. of course, the story for the last couple of weeks on the seedy side of things. schwarzenegger, the love child, and there are reports out this morning that the mother of the love child, former housekeeper patty, has now hired a, looking at the photo there from tmz, she now has hired a los angeles firm to represent her.
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associated press is reporting that the lawyer, michael sauls, represented by a firm out there no plan to file litigation. just yet. she has gotten a lawyer. gets messier, messier, probably a whole bunch of lawyers involved in this thing. she has hers. >> the mistress is lawyering up as they like to say. she is going to be under so much scrutiny. probably didn't have a lot of choice. unfortunately, we have tough news for oscar de la hoya. a lot of people are big fans of his. he has gone into a rehab facility. says he has had some demons he has had a challenging time facing. decided to go to a california rehab facility. not named according to tmz. saying right now he wanted to stop making excuses, he was struggling with substance issues and therefore, he's taking this in his own hands. on that note, we have been letting you know about jeff conaway who took part in dr. drew pinsky's rehab facility.
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didn't work. still struggling with drugs and alcohol. in a coma, past couple days struggling to got through this. tony danza, marilu henner, at his bedside holding vigil for jeff conaway. and we certainly wish him recovery. hopefully he will recover. he had a drug overdose. >> that's tough. >> vigil by his bedside with those stars. we will lighten the mood a little bit here. let's answer, you know, a critical question in hollywood. those who may know christina hendricks of "mad men" she is coming out saying look it is official, real, my breasts are the real thing. >> she is -- >> au naturel. >> au naturel. she gave an interview. they're so real, that any one who has seen or touched a breast would know, she says. >> this is what everybody loves about her, the 1960s, really, i would call it even voluptuous, figure, great to see. we had that waif phase for a long time. don't you prefer a real, curvy woman? >> i don't like the heroin chic, skinny, boney. curves are beautiful things. and she certainly has them. >> she is beautiful. >> if there is anything to be learned from me, i am learning to celebrate what i was born with, though some times inconvenient. i applaud you, christina. >> she plays the secretary. if my husband had a secretary
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that looked like that, i would make sure he got someone else. i would not want her sitting outside. he got some one else. i would not want her sitting outside.
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some storio watch to and here are some stories to watch today on abc news. the israeli prime minister netanyahu presents his mideast peace plan to congress. he's against president obama's plan to establish a palestinian state using 1967 borders. a spokeswoman for the japanese utility said more fuel rods melted down at the fukushima nuclear plant than first thought after the march earthquake and tsunami. christian broadcaster, harold camping said saturday would be doomsday admits he made a slight miscalculation. mark your calendars, camping now says judgment day will be in october, on the 21st. >> he built up his credibility, put a lot of faith in that date. >> make your plans and get that all organized. october 21st, jimmy.
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>> if that doesn't come through. groundhog day. finally, as you know, i make fun of all the animal stories you do on the show. we do them every day. >> i love them. >> but this one is pretty amazing. about a 72-year-old man who took on a seven-foot gator. >> who wouldn't do this for their dog? >> the florida man said he saw his dog get snatched up by the gator. and he sprung into action. victor blackwell reports. >> everybody trying to make a big deal out of it. anybody would have done it. >> reporter: listen to gary murphy's story and ask yourself if you would have done what he did. >> i was going to repair a latch on a boat. >> reporter: he was working on a boat thursday afternoon in palm city. and his 11-year-old west highland terrier was next to him. his name is mcdougal. he calls him doogie. >> we should have named you shadow. >> reporter: as murphy was working in the shadow of the
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boat he heard a yelp. >> i looked down there, i said, seen a gator. i seen him in the gator's mouth. >> reporter: murphy didn't call for someone to help him. there wasn't time. >> i immediately thought, that gator is not getting my dog. i came running over. jumped over the rope and landed on top of the gator right there. >> reporter: a 72-year-old man versus a seven-foot gator. >> i landed on the gator's head, back here, man, the gator's mouth came open, and doogie took off. >> all the way down this side you can see where the teeth got him. punctured a big one underneath. he has got a pretty good one on his belly where they got him. >> friday morning, doogie wasn't doing well. he took him to the vet. >> he is my by, iake just a guy owan prt now you have heard the story, would you fight an alligator to save your pet? if not, you better hope gary murphy is around. >> i probably would have done it for anybody, except a politician. >> good call
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this morning on "world news now," tornado tragedy. the monster twister that flattened much of joplin, missouri, killing dozens of victims. >> the path of destruction several miles long after one of the deadliest tornados in history. it's tuesday, may 24th. good morning, i'm peggy bunker. >> and i'm rob nelson. rescue crews are pushed to the limit this morning as they search for survivors in such a wide path of debris. we will update the overwhelming work as dawn approaches on the second incredibly tough day for those folks in the southwest corner of missouri. >> crews there right now, as we speak, working in the middle of the night. also ahead, one powerful
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storm outbreak after another this spring. weather experts do their best to explain why this is happening during a very mean season. the water, the tornados, the fires, everything we have been reporting it's really been incredible. >> the possible link or not to climate change and global warming. what they say about that as well. later in the show, big business in the hardware industry. from handty new lighting to smarter smoke alarms, our giz wiz is back there the national hardware show with the newest trends for your shelf. as always he brought in pretty cool stuff. >> nothing sexier than the hardware show. all sorts of new gadgets. he brought cool stuff. we are excited to see what they are. first we want to update you on the news this morning. in fact, more than 100 people are confirmed dead in one of the worst twisters ever to hit the
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midwest. >> officials fear that number could go a lot higher as they continue to comb through all the rubble. david muir reports this morning from joplin. >> it is a massive tornado! massive destruction! >> reporter: those tornado sirens went off just 20 minutes of warning, but so deafening many couldn't hear the alarms. andhen it. you can see that this entire neighborhood is completely flattened. it's eerily quiet. hundreds of homes damaged or destroyed. jenna steven's home one of them she took us to the bathroom where she was huddled and praying. on the other side of the wall, another townhouse, her neighbor, the two women would knock on the wall a signw make she took us upshowi vrm hm. you can see the roof completely gone from the top of the house. and the bedrooms have no walls anymore. the powerful ef-4 twister had 200-mile-per-hour winds. in all it left a six-mile path of destruction at times a full mile wide. the massive twister touching down at 5:40 local time, where it sheared off the roof of the
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hospital, st. john's, sucking windows out of the patients' rooms, the hospital paralyzed. as it continued through joplin. subdivisions gone. streets lined with foundations where homes once stood. next to joplin high school, the roof peeled off. entire neighborhoods here have been wiped off the map. you can see all that is left of these homes as far as you can see that way and, really, as far as you can see this way, as well. this family huddled in front of their home now gone. they all survived in the bathroom. they saved a 3-year-old girl across the treeeoth scream >> we had the little girl. >> yeah, we had her. her grandma came and got her. >> but both of her parents are gone. >> she lost both of her parents? >> both of her parents. >> reporter: david muir, abc news. as soon as word of the killer twister hit the news, aid began pouring into joplin. the red cross set up shop at a basketball arena now packed with the newly homeless, as well as the volunteers who are now eager to help. people who survived the tornado
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are now sorting through clothes and food and helping displaced residents find their families. the search for survivors continues overnight. at least 17 people have been found alive so far. the governor says he is optimistic there will be more. josh elliott spent the day with rescue crews. >> just a whopper of a twister here. just incredible damage. >> reporter: doug westhoff worked search-and-rescue for over three decades including september 11th and hurricane katrina. but the killer tornado still took his breath away. his missouri task force one was in joplin just hours after the devastating twister struck. >> when you have widespread damage like this you really have to prioritize where are these people likely at, how many might be in certain areas. >> reporter: doug and his team of 80, many of whom are volunteers, spent most of the day scouring stores like this walmart for survivors. they found no one alive inside and continued searching in the parking lot among the mangled mess of cars. search-and-rescue worker aaron venable and her dog pick have been on the job now roughly 20 hours. how much longer will your team be at it?
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>> you know we will be at it until they tell us they don't need us anymore and until every single person is accounted for. >> reporter: across the street at home depot, rescue workers did find eight people. they aren't done searching. for gary england believes his brother is still inside. he found his truck in the parking lot. >> we haven't found him yet. but we will keep looking or we'll be out here until we find him. >> whoo! yeah! >> reporter: and it is stories like the rescue of this man that are giving people in joplin hope. a text message to his friend that saved his life. >> my friend. my best friend. yeah, i just got message from him. yeah, he said, i'm stuck. >> reporter: certainly those search-and-rescue teams being as weary as they are can use all the help they can get. josh elliott, abc news, joplin, missouri. and our storm coverage continues later this half-hour. as we look at this record season for severe weather. and stay with abc news all day long, get the very latest live on "america this morning" and later, diane sawyer does lead
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our coverage from joplin on "good morning america." thoughts and prayers with everyone in that area. >> oh, boy, that's for sure. and here's a look now at your tuesday forecast. another tornado outbreak threatens a big area from joplin already to dallas. hail, gusty winds. heavy rain from omaha to ohio. and severe weather stretching all the way into the northeast. showers from denver to billings. and light snow in the rockies. meanwhile some showers from seattle to portland. >> we are looking at 65 in boise. 60 in salt lake. 77 in albuquerque. fargo at 66. minneapolis, 68. kansas city coming in at 80. 80s from dallas to miami. 91 in atlanta. in addition to joplin, missouri, there is also lots of tornado damage to fix in the town of reading, kansas. sunday's storm kill manned there whose mobile home was flipped over. more than 100 buildings were damaged and/or destroyed. and they're also working on getting power restored to the entire town, now without water. that was the aftermath. here's what caused it. a rare look at the moment the tornado struck. it was all recorded by one
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business' surveillance cameras. the wind gusts clocked in at up to 165 miles an hour. the stunning power of it nearly defies description. just amazing footage. and the national weather service says that the tornado that killed a man in north minneapolis may have been an ef-2 with winds topping 110 miles an hour. as the clean-up continues, residents are struggling to come to terms with what is left of their homes and neighborhoods. officials put the damage at more than $160 million. switching gears now to overseas news. for confirmation on what many suspected all along about the damaged nuclear plant in japan. the utility that runs it said a total of three reactors suffered meltdowns days after the earthquake and tsunami that admission is raising new questions about what took so long for officials to confirm the severity of the situation. nato warplanes have launched the heaviest bombing attack on the libyan capital since the start of the military campaign. bombs rained down on tripoli
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overnight, nato forces unleashed the first 20 air strikes in less than half an hour. the target was apparently a building used by libyan army volunteers. at least three people were reportedly killed and dozens there wounded. here in new york, a new expanded smoking ban has taken effect, but not everyone is taking heed. cigarette smokers can no longer light up in the city's parks and other public places to protect others, of course, from secondhand smoke. many new yorkers though ignored the ban on the first day. but there was no major crackdown. for now violators are just getting a friendly reminder. down the road, though, they could face a $50 mine. how about that? a lot of people have strong opinions about that. >> oh, yeah. >> we do have an interesting fact this morning on the website for the city of ft. myers, florida, called the city of
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palms. nowhere does it mention black bears. >> wandering around downtown fort myers yesterday, out and about for about an hour. >> take a look at that guy. the wildlife experts cornered him in a parking lot. shot him with a tranquilizer gun and returned to the state forest. usually up in a tree, shoot them with a dart. fall in the trampoline, off they go. very clockwork. >> those animals get away, man. >> where there is a will there is a way. pthe way all right, ♪ oh the bear necessities the simple bear necessities forget about your worries ♪ ♪ and your strife ♪ i got troubles, oh ♪ but not today ♪ 'cause they're gonna wash away ♪ ♪ , ♪ , ♪ they're gonna wash away , ♪ oh, i'm gonna take them away
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you'll get this free information kit... as with all medicare supplement plans, you can keep your own doctor and hospital that accepts # medicare, call this toll-free number now. we return to our top story this morning, of course, the devastating tornado that tore through joplin, missouri. it is yet another violent storm
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that seems to be part of a deadly pattern this year. >> it has a lot of people wondering what is behind all these tornados. is this global warming? to answer that question here is jim avila. >> reporter: shocked and awed by nature. >> this is crazy, you know, this looks like a war zone. >> reporter: tony evans is helping his friend clean up in minneapolis after yet another destructive tornado, in this, the deadliest season in 58 years. >> we have been taking earth for granted. and now i guess it is paying us back. >> reporter: hit by the big three tornado outbreaks of 2011. first, mid april. 24 people die in north carolina. then tuscaloosa, alabama, later that month. ground zero for a line of tornados that killed more than 300 and now at least 116 dead in joplin. are we imagining it or are there more tornados this year? the answer a dramatic yes. 1,000 and counting so far compared to 500 in an average
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year. and these are the deadly variety, 50 killer tornados so far this year, more than double the normal 20. >> this year has really been just the perfect year for tornados. >> reporter: climatologist heidi cullen, writes about global warming and says while climate change has increased humidity levels and can be blamed for general increase in weather, science cannot specifically point to climate change for this hyper-deadly tornado season. >> more extreme events like floods, more extreme events like droughts, heatwaves, wildfires. those are phenomenon that we very much expect to see more of as we move into a warmer world. >> reporter: still we don't know whether or not, tornados are to be lumped into the extreme weather. >> we just don't have enough data to really make the case. >> reporter: so what is the weather reason for this year's tornado spree? colder than normal temperatures off the
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washington/oregon coast, jet- streaming into hot humid gulf air in the south and midwest. meteorologists call it la nina. in tornado alley some just call it nature's payback. jim avala, abc news, new york. >> the sad part, too, the rough weather is not over. there could be another tornado outbreak there today. so just like compounding the devastation there. >> very interesting. and as jim avila was saying, they have not been able to specifically pinpoint this to global warming. no less, 70 tornadoes were produced by the storm system since friday. and just 70 tornados happened on sunday, which is remarkable. >> it its remarkable. scary looking at some of the damage left behind. and in minneapolis there, can't forget about. they had devastation like in missouri as well. the scary part of all this, we are just days from the start of hurricane season. that goes from june 1 to november 30th. >> get ready for that. we haven't even started. >> no, just wild weather. our thoughts and prayers to all those people. and we will be right back. after this. stay with us, everybody.
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welcome back, everybody. well, if you're a do-it-yourself kind of person, and you are always looking then for the newest, greatest hardware tools out there, our "giz wiz," dick debartolo just got back from the national hardware show out in sin city. and he joins me now with the latest hardware you want to get your hands on. welcome. >> hi. >> thank you for being here. as always appreciate it. you made it back from vegas. an accomplishment in and of itself. very, very cool. >> i made it. >> you brought back cool stuff.
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>> sears has a line of tools, next-tech led. what they introduced, quick boost. do-it-yourselfers are doing a project. suddenly their drill dies or the hammer dies. so what they introduced is quick boost so you throw the 12 volt battery in there. hit that down. hit the quick boost button. in three minutes. it brings the battery back to 25% power. so you can take it out. drive another 100 screws, or, hammer another 100 nails. >> in just three minutes. >> three minutes. >> that quick? that's great. for a full charge? >> for a full charge. 30 minutes. >> still great. fantastic. >> three minutes. you always have four screws left. oh, no. and you get complete kits like the hammer hit and the quick charge under $100. >> when you are doing the work around the house or your job, safety first. we all know about safety glasses. >> you are right. these are called light specs vindicator. they're approved, safety glasses. with a difference. the safety glasses have built in l.e.d.s.
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so you not only protect your eyes as you work, but you have light shining exactly where you are looking. >> perfect. that's easy. convenient too. held them a little while ago. they're light. >> they're light. they're under $20. this company. swiss tech, they make every kind of tool to attach to your key chain. this is their newest. microplus, nine in one. >> this thing is so small. >> this little guy. then you fold these out. pair of pliers, inside. bottle opener, wire crimper, wire stripper, down in the arms here, two different sized phillips head screwdrivers. down in here we have two different size screwdrivers. >> on the other side, microwave oven, toaster, wii. >> wii in two years.
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>> how much? >> depending on packaging, $10, $15. >> not bad it does everything. >> this is coming out in august, first alert, voice, smoke alarms. >> good for families especially. >> first alert showed surveys show kids pay more attention to a voice than the alarm beeping. so, if these go off they're going to be sold in pairs or multiple units. >> and they work wirelessly? >> wirelessly. when you first plug it in. hit the button when it says what room you are putting it in. the alarm goes off in the bedroom. it sounds all the alarms throughout the house. but each alarm says, the emergency is in the bedroom. >> identifies through voice where the emergency is. >> yes, exactly. >> that is so helpful. >> and they're also going to have a combination of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. august. >> we like that. >> we have a problem sometimes. surge protectors lie flat on the ground. put the plug in.
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this helps with that. >> the newest version of power square, you can have transformers, plug them in here. this one has a lime condition, surge protector, that's coming out this month. >> you know, worry about lying flat, these bend, do anything you need. >> face them in any direction. >> exactly. >> this is kind of cool, too. this is called the light mine from striker. looks like a mine. let me find it. what you do, it is magnetic. doesn't come with the bake pan. okay. you are working some where. you want the light to shine there. you get the magnet. shine it there. >> working under a sink or something like that. >> or stuck in your car. and you want an emergency blinker on the back bumper. put it there. under 20 bucks. >> a great idea. you bring cool stuff. and i can see this will have a lot of use too. you'll be back next month talking about -- >> father's day gadgets and gifts. >> thank you. appreciate it. good stuff as always. you can get more info on this at gizwiz.biz.
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you are watching "world news now." we'll be right back. hd 3
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"world news now" delivers your "morning papers." >> welcome back, everybody. and this story is, i find very intriguing here. you may have a lot to say. since you are the mother of 6-month-old twins now. >> exactly. a boy and a girl. yep. >> from "the toronto star." this couple is trying to -- the baby born on new year's day. they're trying to raise a genderless baby. they're refusing to say what the gender of their baby is the to us it looks like a boy. they refuse to say. only people that know are the parents, the kid's siblings and close family friends and midwives. who helped to deliver the baby. when the kid was born they sent an e-mail to friends and family, mom and dad, saying we decided not to share storm's sex for
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now. >> the baby's name is storm? that's a whole different story. >> a tribute to freedom and choice in place of limitation, a stand up to what the world could become in storm's lifetime. well, you parents are kind of forcing your political values on this kid. they're saying, look, we want our kids to be free to chose who they should be. >> if they want to be a boy or girl. a trend right now, the mom put the book together because her son liked to wear dresses and she calls him princess boy. and they're trying to be something that she wants people to accept more. so maybe they have a point. but i'm sort of stuck on the storm thing. that's going to be tough for the kid, boy or girl. >> must be from alaska. you guys know i'm an animal nut. a dog nut especially. nothing i won't do for dogs. i don't go this far. some people are. talking about a dog hair website where people are knitting, hats, scarves, mittens out of dog hair. >> are you, are you kidding me? >> apparently it's a thriving cottage industry.
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sprung up selling clothes that come from the hair of canines. experts say the hair is washed several times before it is spun into a doggy mill. they also say white long haired dogs work the best for making different garments. and that some people have like, you know dogs, newfoundland that sheds a lot. they say it's a really good way to deal with this hair. i might get you some of those socks for christmas. >> save the receipt. >> walk the dog and wear the dog. >> it's not doggy smelling. >> thank you. people take the pet thing too far. just putting it out there. >> i do love my dog. interesting issue there overseas here. this girl has been allowed to use her ipod to listen to her ipod during exams. she says music helps her focus on her exams. she will be allowed to listen to the ipod with music on. checked out by a teacher to make sure no cheating is going on.
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this morning on "world news now" -- destruction and disbelief. the gigantic deadly tornado, a half mile wide, that has leveled much of joplin, missouri. >> and there is an overwhelming overnight search for survivors in so much debris. it's tuesday, may 24th. good morning everyone. i'm rob nelson. >> i'm peggy bunker. with wind speeds topping 200 miles an hour, the path of destruction is absolutely tremendous. we will see how challenging it is to search for survivors there as the death toll continues to go up. we will also have a live report ahead. also in this half hour of the show, the president put fema to work, of course, to help out those tornado survivors, he also
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celebrated his own heritage in a small town in ireland. today he will be surrounded by, yep, british royalty. kind of amazing though, the ethnic background of our president. having his guinness overseas yesterday. >> had a pint. over there. or as they call it, a meal. coming up later, las vegas would like to build a ferris wheel larger than the london eye. we will get a sneak peek at this very dramatic plan for sin city. that would actually sort of work on the strip, don't you think? >> what doesn't work on the strip? vegas is like my spiritual mecca. anything they want to do is fine with me. i love that town. >> we need to talk about that. >> in the break. before all that silly stuff, we get to the serious news, that is the search for survivors going on in joplin right now with another ten people found alive in the rubble in just the past few hours. >> hard to imagine what they have been through. there are now fears the death toll in joplin will go much higher as the search efforts continue. t.j. winick is joining us live with the very latest. t.j., the pictures we are seeing are just incredible. >> reporter: absolutely, rob and peggy.
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good morning. the scope of the devastation here if joplin is truly remarkable. back here behind me, the debris field, though it is dark right now, take my word for it, it stretches as far as the eye can see. and this car right here, this is one of dozens nearby that is now a twisted mess of metal after the twister on sunday. as you mentioned, the death toll right now here in joplin stands at 116. but that is certainly and sadly expected to rise. the twister that shredded the city of joplin, missouri, sunday was the deadliest tornado in more than six decades. >> a lot of people need a lot of help. >> reporter: so many here lost everything. now they're trying to figure out what's next? >> i don't know what i'm going to do. i'm going to salvage what i can. >> there it is, tornado is coming into the city. massive tornado. massive destruction. >> reporter: the ef-4 tornado was huge, powerful and ferocious. people huddled in the dark waiting for the terror to end.
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that's the scene described by some caught in the emergency room at st. john's hospital, the top two floors ripped off and the windows shattered. >> there was no light. and we had very little flashlights. they were screaming and looking for their loved ones. >> reporter: rescue crews searched for survivors aisle by aisle in a wal-mart. in the home depot across the street, eight people were found. one did not survive. but moments like this keep hope alive. this trapped man sent text messages to his friend. >> yeah, my friend -- my best friend. yeah, i just -- i just got a message from him. he said i'm stuck. >> reporter: i must tell you that the weather here was pretty horrendous yesterday as well. there were torrential downpours, lightning all day long, two-inch hail. and there was actually a tornado watch yesterday till about noontime.
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rob and peggy? >> no relief for the weary. t.j., as the aftermath becomes clearer, what are some health concerns perhaps emerging at this point? >> reporter: well, certainly, with everything being uprooted around here, there is a lot of open sewer and gas lines. a lot of dust and debris in the air as well as germs. american red cross and a lot of nonprofits are handing out what they're calling hygiene bags with just a lot of basic toiletries in them. soap and shampoo, toothpaste and toothbrushes. they're telling people if they want to donate, contribute, make up the bags at home and drop them off at checkpoints around the city. >> t.j., amazingly we saw the one man rescued after texting with his friend. how has social media played a role in some of the rescues as well? >> reporter: well, a huge role. in the immediate aftermath of the tornado, voice service was actually down on cell phones. but texting was available.
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so in addition to texting, and checking in with one another, folks here were using social media sites like facebook and twitter, so it just -- you know bringing people up to date. not only people around the country, but also one another to let people know they're okay. there is a big site right now on facebook called joplin tornado information. and it really gives people a sense of the desperation that is happening here in joplin. there are people in the city. outside the city. asking if folks are okay, if they could call and let them know. if people could check in on people at certain addresses. and so, again, it gives you a sense of the desperation here. but it's also a very valuable way of communicating when so many other ways are unavailable. >> again, those websites serving as a lifeline in yet another crisis. t.j. winick reporting live this morning from joplin, missouri. thanks, t.j. while this is the nation's
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deadliest single twister in more than 60 years and the second major tornado disaster in just less than a month. sam champion has a look now at the destructive power of the tornado that hit joplin. >> national weather service preliminary put out an estimate that 198 mile an hour winds, the top end of an ef-4 tornado through the area. just looking at this damage you can tell. just by the things being crumpled up. the baseboards being cleared. and everything around us just destroyed. what we have just been standing through, the hail that -- the large hailstones, this continues for at least, two, three days here. this is a stationary pattern. these areas of low pressure will drive storms like this every day for the next two days. >> that is our weather editor, sam champion reporting from joplin. later on this half hour, how the joplin community is pulling together dug this disaster. and also, stay with abc news throughout the day. we'll have live updates on "america this morning." and diane sawyer leads our coverage on "good morning america." and forecasters say that the deadly tornado that ripped
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through north minneapolis may have been an ef-2, with winds there topping 110 miles an hour. as the cleanup in that area continues, residents are struggling to come to terms with what's left of their homes and their neighborhoods. one woman who survived the storm with her five young children now says they have nowhere else to turn. >> but, yeah, i'm upset. because we are not getting no help. nobody -- it's easy for them to say, go to this place. go to that place. okay, how? if the cars have been demolished. >> one person was killed during the storm there. and another man collapsed and died after the tornado hit. at the time he was trying to chainsaw a tree that was blocking his street. taking a look now at the forecast which will be important for some of the rescue efforts. severe storms from texas, to new york. a threat of tornadoes from dallas, wichita city, and joplin. up to five inches of rain from oklahoma to ohio. light snow in the rockies.
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showers from denver, billings also the pacific northwest. >> 67 in seattle. 74 in sacramento. 88 in phoenix. omaha heats up to 81. and heating up on the east coast. 83 in new york. 91 in atlanta. and 86 in miami. ships are once again passing through a stretch of the swollen mississippi river that had been closed since an accident friday. the coast guard allowed northbound traffic to resume at baton rouge yesterday. southbound ships are being blocked. the coast guard is now trying to figure out the best way to remove the three barges that sank. and farther east, flooding is becoming a real problem in maryland. lots of rain, high level of the chesapeake bay, that's put low-lying parts of the capital, annapolis, underwater. there are also fears it could get a lot worse. flash flood warnings posted through tomorrow. turning overseas now to the increasing number of flight cancellations due to the ash plume from that erupting volcano in iceland. the ash drifting nearly 30,000 feet in the air right now.
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it forced several airlines including british airways to cancel flights between london and scotland already today. we could know later today if transatlantic flights to and from the uk will also be impacted. and one flight that was affected was president obama's. the ash there forced him to leave ireland earlier than scheduled. he's now in london for a full slate of events. >> mr. obama's stay in ireland was a real family affair you could say. traveling with the president and sunlen miller has more. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, peggy, rob. the president announced himself as barack obama of the moneygall obamas. the city embraced him as family. a pint shared with the president's eighth cousin. once a stranger, but over a guinness, a friend. >> the president pays his bar tab. >> reporter: in front of 25,000 people, later in downtown dublin, the president paid ode to a nation of his family history. including the language. >> some wise irish man or woman once said that broken irish is better than clever english.
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[ cheers ] so here goes. [ speaking foreign language ] i am happy to be in ireland. >> reporter: from ireland to england. the obamas didn't receive an invitation to the royal wedding, but today they will have an official state visit with the queen of england. they met before, but this time, the first couple will sleep in buckingham palace. they will have a formal lunch with the queen majesty herself. and the president will meet with the prime minister and the opposition leader. the obamas arrived in england one night early. they were forced to leave ireland due to the volcanic ash making its way from iceland. the queen didn't have vacancy last night, so the obamas chose a hotel instead. peggy and rob? >> thank you, sunlen miller reporting there. and the president's flight was not his only mode of transportation that had a little problem.
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>> as mr. obama's motorcade was leaving the american embassy in dublin, his armored limousine got stuck on the driveway. without enough clearance, the big black cadillac known as the beast couldn't move forward or even back. >> how about that? ultimately pulled a bus in front to obscure everybody's view as they watched them struggle there. the first couple then continued their journey in a second limo. >> hard to believe the beast gets stuck. even the president has car troubles. more "world news now" coming up in just a second. ♪ clowns to the left of me jokers to the right here i am ♪ ♪ stuck in the middle with you
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and we return now to our top story, the tragedy in joplin. crews will be back out this morning, searching for missing people.
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>> and of course, that means that the people of joplin will start to rebuild. to do that they will have to rely on each other. diane sawyer has their story. >> reporter: walk on a neighborhood street in joplin, missouri, knock on any door and there is a story of amazing survival. >> my husband took his shirt off down the street to give it to an elderly woman that was just bleeding everywhere. >> reporter: neighbors who escaped unscathed helped those who weren't as lucky. and as the sky continued to pour down rain and lightning struck, alarms continued to ring. there were constant warnings that another tornado could be just around the corner. in this midwest town of 50,000 residents, the people say their strength is just way of life. it was a pioneering town, the zinc capital of the world. and then a hot spot on route 66. even today, many remember how the town pulled together after the tornados in '71 and '73.
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>> the memory of times past will define our character as we journey ahead yet another chapter in life. ♪ >> reporter: in the last few hours before the tragedy, the town of joplin was filled with pride and excitement, the high school graduating class took to the stage to accept diplomas. >> meg carlisle. >> reporter: and promised a future filled with hope. >> i had just gotten home from graduation. i was still in cap and gown when it hit. >> reporter: those speeches, the search for optimism, the search for light, still echoing even in joplin today. take charge and dream big. smile, it will make you feel better. >> from a high school graduation ceremony to that tragedy just hours later. as we mentioned earlier in the show, there are several facebook pages in case you want to send your thoughts and prayers to the victims of the tornado. >> of course, community leaders are tweeting. a lot of people are taking to facebook saying this is not going to take us down. we are a strong community. and they're relying on each other. >> resilience always in tragedy. more after the break.
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stay with us. . stay with us.
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some lighter news, sad news for you oprah fans. one down and two more shows to go until ms. oprah winfrey signs off. >> i'm going to be very sad. we were all talking about yesterday's show. in her 25 years, oprah introduced her fans to thousands of products, books, and we ate them all up. it was the craze that came to be known as the oprah effect. lara spencer has more. >> i'm oprah winfrey. >> reporter: it's the little things over the past 25 years that have soared oprah to stardom, influencing millions with every tear, interview and every giveaway. >> whoo! >> reporter: with over 40 million viewers each week,
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broadcasting in 150 different countries, oprah has had 283 different favorite things. and when she speaks, we listen. she transformed a generation in what we call the oprah effect. >> don't you love a good knife? this is a kyocera ceramic knife. >> reporter: take kyocera. this ceramic knife set, included on her favorite things list and right after, national cookware chain sur la table sold more of these bad boys than they had the year before. from spanx, to panini presses to uggs, oprah's list makes the products must-haves for viewers. >> we were lucky to be oprah's favorite things. and overnight things changed. >> reporter: patricia helding, founder of fat witch brownies, was featured on oprah's favorite things in 2002. >> the phone did not stop ringing. we could not keep up with it. it took us six months to get through all the orders.
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>> reporter: she went from a struggling business owner to flourishing baker within months of the episode airing. and nine years later? >> our original fat witch. >> reporter: she is still on top. >> still our biggest seller. >> reporter: carol's daughter, a beauty store in new york city blossomed after being featured on oprah several years ago. >> we made the appearance on oprah and our website crashed. during the show we went from like four visitors to 17,000. >> reporter: carol's daughter was a $2 million company. after oprah's endorsement, today they're worth over $30 million. >> it is like getting the seal of approval. you know, like, oh, it must be a great brand because oprah likes it. >> reporter: for these women the oprah effect changed their lives and both agree, you can't get better advertising than that. >> i'm so grateful to oprah for showing me what success looks like. >> i cannot thank her enough. i don't have words. >> i think that is a good way to sum up oprah. there aren't words. she's just changed everything for so many people. really. >> economic impact is
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well, if you have been to las vegas, then you have probably seen it all. if it exists, it exists in vegas, that is for sure. soon you will be able to see sin city like you have never seen it before. >> a developer getting ready to roll out a 500 foot ferris wheel right there on the strip giving visitors the bird's eye view of the glory that is vegas. >> is that what you call it? >> that's what i call it. kntv's mikala kern has more. >> reporter: more tourism and more jobs. that's what supporters of the skyview superwheel project say a
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giant ferris wheel will bring to vegas. this city recently ranked second in the country as one of the worst places to find a job. sky view hopes to create 400 over the next two years. >> our construction people tell us we will have 200 jobs during phases of construction and about another 200 jobs, permanent jobs in the operation of the wheel and the retail complex down below. >> reporter: this is what attracted county commissioners who gave the project a rare unanimous yes. >> you can have hundreds of people put back to work and that says a lot right there. that helped along with that 7-0 vote in knowing it will create jobs. >> reporter: the first phase of the project begins with the demolishing of this 50-year-old hotel. in its place, a 500-foot tall ferris wheel, which will be taller than the mandalay bay hotel. the wheel will have an l.e.d. screen in the middle larger than a football field, more than three dozen gondolas, capable of
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holding 22 passengers and a breathtaking view of the las vegas strip. below the wheel, sky view developers will construct 140,000 feet of restaurant and retail space. >> this is going to change the skyline of the las vegas strip in a major way. i mean, to have a structure as big as the mandalay bay, that's pretty exciting. >> reporter: they hope this change will bring in thousands of new tourists to las vegas. >> i love it. las vegas. big, gaudy. >> i wouldn't want to walk under the ferris wheel. people getting on there after all sorts of things. >> you never know what is falling down. 2013, they expect that thing to open. the wheel of london gets almost 4 million visitors every year. imagine what it could do for vegas. >> and the 40 gondolas there they hold up to 22 people. it will be different than the regular ferris wheel. >> vegas, a playground for adults. >> don't go into detail. wrap it up right there. >> there is the best. everybody will flock to vegas.ab
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this morning on "world news now" -- a city shattered. what is left of joplin, missouri, after a tornado packing 200-mile-an-hour wind gusts decimated homes, businesses and hospitals. >> and the exhausting work to find victims and survivors in the debris is continuing overnight. it's tuesday, may 24th. good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> and i'm peggy bunker. what amazing stories of survival we are hearing from joplin's main hospital where patients and staff coped after taking a direct hit from the tornado. we're also seeing these menacing pictures of the monster twister as it rolled in and approached joplin. pretty incredible. a lot of storm chasers caught it on camera. you can see here, it's dark and ominous.
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>> it's funny. they said they had about a 24-minute warning. but the winds were so crazy that kind of drowned out the noise of the sirens. >> right, to let people know. >> that says it all. also in this half-hour, more flights are being grounded as volcanic ash drifts into airline traffic, yet another icelandic volcano, now a cause for some pretty big concerns. >> yet again. coming up a little bit later, a little dog's life threatened by an alligator. take a look at the pooch, he ended up in a gator's mouth. we'll let you know how this went down. even you are rooting for this guy. >> you can't help it. >> cute pooch. looks like a westy like mine. >> we know you have a soft spot for those. all right. but first, there is more hope now that survivors will still be found in the rubble that was once the city of joplin. at least 17 people have been pulled out alive so far. >> but rescue work is challenged by stormy weather and the sheer amount of debris. t.j. winick joins us this morning from joplin with more. t.j. >> reporter: good morning, rob, peggy, the devastation here is absolutely remarkable.
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the debris field behind me here stretches as far as the eye can see. this car right here is one of dozens in the area which is absolutely mangled as a result of sunday's twister. the death toll right now stands at 116 in joplin. though that number sadly is likely to rise. this is what is left of john degraf's house after a deadly tornado struck sunday before dinner time. >> i'm going to salvage what i can. >> reporter: still he considers himself lucky. >> i am alive. you know? my whole -- my family's good. everybody is good. >> reporter: his 73-year-old neighbor is still missing. they're searching for him in this rubble. >> doing our best to find out if he is in there. >> reporter: winds up to 200 miles an hour tore apart more than 2,000 homes here, turning neighborhoods into what resembles a post-nuclear strike. natural gas fires added to the eeriness of the scenery. >> there it is. tornado coming into the city!
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>> reporter: this amateur video captured the twister as it touched down. >> massive tornado doing massive destruction. >> reporter: at the heart of the destruction, st. john's regional medical center, a seven-story structure. now missing its top two floors, all of the windows have been blown out. mark harrington was in the emergency room. >> you heard a loud roar, all the windows started breaking. you could hear things blowing through the hospital. >> reporter: forecasters say this twister was one of the deadliest in missouri history and could have been worse had there been no warnings. >> all 25 sirens in the city of joplin did activate. according to our records, we had about a 20-minute notice when we turned on the sirens to when we actually got the first report of a tornado strike. >> reporter: officials are convinced advanced notice of the approaching storm saved lives. because of the stationary weather pattern holding over the midwest, the low-pressure system which is driving these nasty rainstorms is likely to stay here for the next couple of days. rob and peggy? >> all right, t.j. thank you. as you heard, people living in joplin had only minutes to prepare before that big twister hit. and that, of course, is when all hell broke loose.
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[ winds blowing ] >> there it is. there it is. oh, gosh. that is a monster tornado. >> i gotta turn around. >> it's getting, big, big, big, big. >> that's huge! >> oh, my god. >> help! [ screaming ] >> heavenly father. jesus, jesus. heavenly father. >> oh, my god! [ screaming ] >> moments of terror for those folks. our coverage of the huge tornado in joplin continues later this
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half-hour with a dramatic look at the hospital that took a direct hit in all of this. of course, you can stay with abc news all morning long. we will have live updates on "america this morning" and also later on "good morning america," diane sawyer will lead our extensive coverage this morning. >> of course, a lot of folks will be watching the weather. it is still stormy in the plains and midwest. tornados could be there. also 80-mile-an-hour winds. baseball-sized hail from dallas to joplin, missouri. gusty winds, hail, and rain, from san antonio to d.c. and new york city. showers and light snow in the rockies. showers in the pacific northwest. >> 60s from seattle to colorado springs. 64 in chicago. 71 in detroit. 80 in kansas city. near 90 from baltimore to new orleans. the focus has been on joplin, but there is a tornado that barreled through north minneapolis sunday. that's caused more than $160 million in damage. a curfew has been lifted but residents are still being kept out of the hardest hit parts of the city so crews can clean up
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there. one person was killed. dozens injured. hundreds remain in shelters after their homes were crushed. the clean-up is well under way in la crosse, wisconsin, where a tornado roared through on sunday. that twister damaged at least 200 homes and businesses. one victim said it looked like the world was coming to an end. miraculously, no one was seriously hurt. in other news this morning shipping traffic has resumed along a nine-mile stretch of the mississippi river. the coast guard shut it down at baton rouge after an accident caused three barges to sink. however, northbound traffic was allowed to resume yesterday afternoon. and southbound ships will be allowed to travel downriver once the backup has been cleared. we could know by the end of the day if transatlantic flights will be affected by this growing ash plume from an erupting volcano in iceland. flights in britain have been canceled. as david shukman of the bbc reports, there are some similarities and differences to the eruption last year.
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>> reporter: it's happening all over again. a vast tower of ash, ballooning into the sky above iceland. the clouds streaked with flashes of lightning. and a wind that's blowing the stuff our way. it's not the same volcano as last year, but the ash is being blasted higher, the aviation authorities are warning that flights will be disrupted. the eruption is much bigger than the one last year, it's throwing out far more ash. but the particles inside the cloud are larger than last time. so they're heavier, which means they should drop into the ocean more quickly. in any event the airline authorities have agreed new rules. planes can fly in up to this level of ash, a very light concentration. and into this denser cloud of ash if they have permission. so there should be less disruption than last time. the first british airports to be affected are in scotland, aberdeen disrupted by strong winds. passengers were hearing about the ash cloud. >> we see it when we arrive in norway. we don't know if we manage to come back, but we will see. no, we are not, we are not
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worried. >> reporter: in iceland itself, a dark cloud has descended and the ash is everywhere. imagine trying to keep it out of your car. this eruption is the largest the country has seen for 50 years and it's still going strong. david shukman, bbc news. the ash plume did force president obama to leave ireland earlier than scheduled. the highlight of the first day of his european trip was a visit to the hometown of his great, great, great grandfather. he met his closest remaining irish relative in a stop at a local pub for, yeah, a pint of guinness. mr. obama is now in london having meetings today with british leaders before a state dinner. and sleepover at buckingham palace. can't go to ireland and not have a pint of guinness. >> got to do it. >> there you go. from the current president to the former one. for this we go to white sox rangers game last night in texas. >> yeah, chicago catcher trying to catch a foul ball. then he came face to face with, yep, former president, george w.
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bush. the bushes were sitting in the owner's box along with rangers' team president nolan ryan. >> and, looking at the video. wanted to see what happened. mr. bush appeared to say something to the player who seemed to linger briefly before heading back behind the plate. i was looking to see what laura did. looked like she sort of ducked and took cover. >> the president has good reflexes. remember -- the person that threw the shoe. got all matrix on him. he's, the president is quick. >> he was right there. >> more "world news now" coming up. well done, mr. president. >> watch this. ♪ put me in coach i'm ready to play today, put me in coach ♪ hó
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tough to look at these pictures there. back to our top story. we are talking about the direct hit. an american tragedy in joplin, missouri. in the town of 47,000, there is destruction as far as the eye can see in just about every direction. >> oh, yeah, including at the hospital where devastation there was endless. it was so bad that, get this, medical supplies from inside the building were found almost 100 miles away. diane sawyer has more. >> reporter: as the tornado right out of a nightmare tore through joplin, citizens huddled inside buildings in the dark. [ screaming ] >> reporter: listen, as these people feel, sense what is around them. [ screaming ] >> jesus, jesus, jesus! >> reporter: a scene described by sheila and mark harrington, as they huddled inside a giant hospital, st. john's, in the
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emergency room. >> there was no light. and we had very little flashlights. they were screaming and looking for their loved ones and saying that they couldn't find them. and they wanted someone to help them. >> reporter: more than 100 patients were inside the nine-story hospital. gurneys, wheelchairs, tossed hundreds of yards away. x-rays, medical records dumped two counties away, 60 miles, carried by the tornado. and inside the hospital, there was triage, there was rushing to help, but still, so many died. rod pace, one of the medical flight managers, described holding on to a door trying to keep it shut against the suction as it tore the building apart. >> we were holding the door closed. we were trying to hold the door closed. it felt like the door would move. i have heard people talk about a building and how it breathes when it is on fire. >> reporter: right. >> it felt like that building was breathing. that door would move in and out. >> could you feel the suction?
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did it pull on you? what happened? >> we moved in and out. with the door. the door never came open. >> reporter: holding on to it like this? >> it's an automatic locking door. essentially i was leaning into the door. one of the pilots was basically holding on to me. >> reporter: in the aftermath the entire hospital evacuated in just 90 minutes. medical personnel loading patients on the back of pickup trucks and rushing them to a nearby hospital or another triage center. some held the iv poles for the patients. while seeing all around them a scene from "armageddon." >> this structure has been here a long, long time and meant a lot to the people that work in it and a lot to the community. and that's, that's a major devastation. >> you can imagine so many folks in the area looking for loved ones who are still missing. if you are one of them, the red cross safe and well website is where you can turn to locate
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anyone you may tbe looking for. >> the reality, this is still unfolding. the story is just happening right now even in the middle of the night as they continue to look for people who might be trapped. so an ongoing situation that is getting updated every minute. >> they have found some survivors, which is -- just gives some much-needed hope. of course stay with abc news for continuing coverage all morning of this tragedy, diane sawyer leading our coverage later today on "good morning america." okay. and coming up, we are going to shift gears and talk a little bit about arnold schwarzenegger. the former maid, housekeeper, mother of his love child is going to take some legal action. >> we're right on top of that. the final performances of the season on "dancing with the stars." who you think will win. the "skinny" is coming up.
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♪ skinny ♪ skinny ♪ so skinny >> all right, time for your "skinny" now. and first we'll lead off with, of course, "dancing with the stars" down to the final three. everyone wondering who will take the lead. some people say kirstie is the fan favorite, chelsea is doing well. hines is doing really well. who is it going to be? >> no one knows. the big finale is tonight. interesting to see who comes out on top.
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i think hines ward may pull it out here. i think kirstie is the sent mental favorite. not sure she is the best dancer of the three. >> but she did a cartwheel last night. she dropped a lot of weight. she looks really good for all that exercise. reality is -- everybody looks really good. could be anybody's guess who will get the mirror ball trophy. afterwards i don't know what you do with it. hang it from the ceiling? >> what would you do with the big thing? good luck to the final three. sure it will be a good finale tonight. >> can't wait to see. of course, the story for the last couple of weeks on the seedy side of things. schwarzenegger, the love child, and there are reports out this morning that the mother of the love child, former housekeeper of 20 years, patty, has how to hired a -- looking at the photo there from tmz -- she now has hired a los angeles firm to represent her. associated press is reporting that the lawyer, michael sauls, represented by a firm out there no plan to file litigation. just yet. she has gotten a lawyer. as this thing gets messier and
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messier, probably a whole bunch of lawyers involved in this thing. she has hers. >> the mistress is lawyering up as they like to say. she is going to be under so much scrutiny. probably didn't have a lot of choice. unfortunately, we have tough news for oscar de la hoya. a lot of people are big fans of his. he has gone into a rehab facility. says he has had some demons he has had a challenging time facing. decided to go to a california rehab facility. it's not been named, according to tmz. he said right now he wanted to stop making excuses. he was struggling with substance issues. and therefore, he's taking this in his own hands. on that note, we have been letting you know about jeff conaway who took part in dr. drew pinsky's rehab facility. didn't work. still struggling with drugs and alcohol. he's in a coma right now, the past couple of days he's been really struggling to get through this. tony danza, marilu henner, at his bedside holding vigil for jeff conaway. and we certainly wish him recovery. hopefully he will recover. he had a drug overdose. >> that's tough.
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>> very tough. >> vigil by his bedside with those stars. we will lighten the mood a little bit here. let's answer, you know, a critical question in hollywood. those who may know christina hendricks of "mad men" she is coming out saying look it is official. it's real. my breasts are the real thing. >> she is au naturel. >> au naturel. she gave an interview. she said, they're so obviously real, that anyone who has seen or touched a breast would know, she says. >> this is what everybody loves about her, the 1960s, really, i would call it even voluptuous, figure, great to see. we had that waif phase for a long time. don't you prefer a real, curvy woman? >> i don't like the heroin chic, skinny, boney. curves are beautiful things. and she certainly has them. >> she is beautiful. >> and she says if there is anything to be learned from me, it's that i'm learning to celebrate what i was born with,
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even though sometimes it's inconvenient. i applaud you, christina. >> she plays the secretary. if my husband had a secretary that looked like that, i would make sure he got someone else. i would not want her sitting outside.
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and here are some stories to watch today on abc news. the israeli prime minister netanyahu presents his mideast peace plan to congress. he's against president obama's plan to establish a palestinian state using 1967 borders. a spokeswoman for the japanese utility said more fuel rods melted down at the fukushima nuclear plant than first thought after the march earthquake and tsunami. water apparently kept the rods cool and minimized danger. christian broadcaster, harold camping said saturday would be doomsday admits he made a slight miscalculation. mark your calendars, camping now says judgment day will be in october, on the 21st. >> he built up his credibility, put a lot of faith in that date. >> make your plans and get that all organized. october 21st, jimmy. >> if that doesn't come through. groundhog day. finally, as you know, i make
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fun of all the animal stories you do on the show. we do them every day. >> i love them. >> but this one is pretty amazing. about a 72-year-old man who took on a seven-foot gator. >> who wouldn't do this for their dog? the florida man said he saw his dog get snatched up by the gator. and he sprung into action. victor blackwell reports. >> anybody would have done it. everybody is trying to make a big deal out of it. anybody would have done it. >> reporter: listen to gary murphy's story and ask yourself if you would have done what he did. >> i was going to repair a latch on a boat. >> reporter: he was working on a boat thursday afternoon in palm city. and his 11-year-old west highland terrier was next to him. his name is mcdougal. he calls him doogie. >> we should have named you shadow. >> reporter: as murphy was working in the shadow of the boat he heard a yelp. >> i looked down there, and i saw the gator. i saw doogie in the gator's mouth. >> reporter: murphy didn't call for someone to help him.
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there wasn't time. >> i immediately thought, that gator is not getting my dog. i came running over. jumped over the rope and landed on top of the gator right there. >> reporter: a 72-year-old man versus a seven-foot gator. >> i landed on the gator's head, back here, man, the gator's mouth came open, and doogie took off. >> reporter: murphy took his dog home. >> all the way down this side you can see where the teeth got him. punctured a big one underneath. he has got a pretty good one on his belly where they got him. >> reporter: friday morning, doogie wasn't doing well. he took him to the vet. >> he is my buddy, i can't make a move without him. >> reporter: the vet says doogie will be fine in time. murphy says he is not a hero, just a guy who wanted to protect his dog. now you have heard the story, would you fight an alligator to save your pet? if not, you better hope gary murphy is around. >> i probably would have done it for anybody, except a politician. >> good call. you have a westie, you would fight a gator. >> are you kidding, i would have the gator into a handbag in two minutes.
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